The America I Know and Love: My rebuttal to Slate.com

I don’t write about politics on my personal blog.

As a rule, I try not to touch the topic with a ten-foot pole, outside of ‘liking’ the occasional Tweet or sharing the occasional Facebook post.

But, today, I’m breaking my rule.

It’s time to set the record straight by addressing some things that are blatantly false and negatively influencing readers. I don’t want to attack anyone, just the opposite, in fact. I want you to step away from this blog piece feeling incredibly encouraged.

What I recently read in a Slate.com article sickened me. It was chock-full of gross misrepresentations and blatant deceptions.

I’m sick of lies, aren’t you?

I was a Democrat

Let me start by saying I love this country.

It’s not hard for me to express how much I love America. I was born and raised here and enjoy every bit of it regardless of who’s president.

I also grew up and identified as a Democrat.

There’s nothing wrong in saying the D-word or being affiliated with that party. I certainly don’t hate anyone who believes differently than I do. (PSA: You shouldn’t either.)

There’s two reasons I subscribed to this political party. One, was because of the influence of my parents and the other reason was because of where I grew up.

Politically, I grew up in northeastern Minnesota on a place known as the Iron Range. Living in this region meant you leaned to the left of the political spectrum. Growing up in northeastern Minnesota in the late 1970’s, 1980’s and 1990’s meant you voted blue. If you grew up here, it meant you were a Democrat.

I am a Conservative

For me, something snapped when I went to college.

I formed my own worldview that would later catapult me to the conservative worldviews I hold today.

Which is odd because most colleges are diametrically opposed to a conservative worldview.

Two events in my life triggered my tip towards conservative values. The first was when I met the late Senator Paul Wellstone.

The late Senator and I shared a brief interaction at a college campaign event I attended. I asked Senator Wellstone some straightforward questions about funding for students of Minnesota state universities and what he was doing to help. Twice, he completely avoided the question and instead pivoted into some speech about how he’s focused on protecting the middle class and the working class.

The exchange with the Senator bothered me. It wasn’t his lack of an answer that bothered me, as I fully expect politicians to be vague when answering questions. What upset me was the way he handled himself leaving us “common folk” feeling like we didn’t matter. That’s when I determined the Democratic party that I grew up believing was good and right, was wrong (for me, at least).

My affection and love for the United States Constitution is the other conviction that drove me to form my conservative worldview.

I believe we have a Constitution for a reason, and like the late Charles Krauthammer, I think the Constitution is one of the most miraculous and extraordinary documents ever written.

I subscribe to the belief that states can govern themselves with limited federal oversight. I also believe in low regulation. I’ve rarely seen anything that’s micro-managed through regulation produce anything that’s good.

I believe that every single American citizen has the right and freedom to give themselves a better life through education, wealth, and service. Every American deserves the freedom to obtain this through hard work.

These benefits (life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness) are freedoms that should never, ever be taken away from American citizens. These freedoms are also the foundation of my conservative worldview.

Living in northeastern Minnesota, I was influenced to think that conservatives are bad people.

I was influenced to think that conservatives are money-grubbing monsters who hate the poor, the widowed, and the elderly. The media and most of the teachers who educated me perpetuated this worldview.

But, that’s not the real world and that’s not what I experienced.

Over time, I slowly began to learn that conservatives were not bad people or the monsters that the media led me to believe.

No President is that diabolical

In a recent Slate.com article, author Lili Loofbourow called the President corrupt and weak.

To make a generalization that President Trump is “corrupt and weak,” based on some unproven improprieties, isn’t right. No one is that smart or diabolical to be involved in that many scandals of corruption, all at the same time.

If these so-called scandals were true about the President, then that’s one heck of a storyline that some writer needs to turn into a money-making Jack Reacher novel.

Let’s replay this narrative that the left will want you and I to believe:

  • A sitting President single-handedly rigs an entire election with foreign help from Russia (and cleverly run Facebook ad campaigns).
  • He does so while sleeping with a pornstar.
  • He continues to do so while making billions of dollars from government contracts that were guaranteed with help from his business cronies.
  • Law enforcement, attorneys, and the FBI have zero indictable proof that he’s somehow breaking the law, and not one law enforcement agency has any tangible evidence of any of these allegations.
  • Even though we have some of the finest and smartest law enforcement officials on the planet, not one of them has a shred of anything tangible that links our President to any of the wicked deeds that are being portrayed by the mainstream media.

It sounds like one, big conspiracy theory doesn’t it?

No one is that diabolical to commit these evil acts, and somehow do them in less than 24 months after taking office.

Your rights and my rights are not being eroded

As a nation, we’ve never been as free as we are today. Let’s break down these freedoms.

  • The Women’s suffrage movement granted women the right to vote, in 1920.
  • The Voting Rights Act of 1965 allowed everyone to vote, no matter your skin color.
  • Abortion’s are legal, per the 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade. (this will never be overturned)
  • In 2015, the Supreme Court struck down bans on same-sex marriage, legalizing it in all fifty states.
  • Divorce is legal so you can get out of any marriage, straight or gay.
  • While guns are still legal in the U.S., there are now more background checks and regulations than ever before, along with bans on specific types of weapons that didn’t originally exist with the creation of the 2nd Amendment.
  • LGBTQ and Transgenders have rights and protections.
  • Everyone has the freedom to live and work wherever they want.
  • Access to money (and debt) has never been easier through credit cards, banks, etc.
  • Organized religions are being regulated at higher numbers than ever before, and yet everyone still has the freedom to pray to whatever god they want.
  • Immigrants CAN enter into the United States unlawfully and can even receive basic benefits despite not being lawful citizens.
  • And, sadly, anyone can still burn the American flag in protest without being arrested.

So, tell me, what can’t a person do in America?

What is SO bad about living in America that you’d need to write an article titled “The America We Thought We Knew Is Gone?”

What I see is a list of freedoms that only continues to grow.

The lies we are told

What grieves me is that I see a nation of sheep, myself included, that are led astray by stories that are nothing more than crafty fables with words that tickle our ears.

Oh, the lies we are told – lies that are spoken with little to no consequence.

It’s disturbing that authors are writing pieces about virtues such as truth when the very basis of many of their so-called truths are built on a foundation of poison.

The constant bombardment of lies makes you jaded, cynical, and fills you full of hatred.

These lies are told in small, disguised methods. The lies are told to the young, the impressionable, and the gullible. The liars and deceivers say ‘the way this country is being run is wrecking your life and keeping it the same is called capitalism. Things could be better and that’s called socialism.

These lies are being published under the guise of op-ed’s and opinion pieces. These lies are published by large media outlets, aka the mainstream media. These lies say things like it’s okay to tax (and punish) businesses to a high degree, make healthcare complicated and expensive, despise the wealthy, regulate everything including the internet by calling it neutral, and extend zero empathy.

And, if I disagree with what you say, protest in mob while physically attacking me and my family with vengeance.

This is the result of the lies you and I are being fed. These lies aren’t coming from the current White House, either.

The America I know and love

Kids aren’t being violently ripped from their parents at the U.S. border, civil rights are not in danger, and Roe v Wade will never be overturned.

Are there issues that exist in America? Yes, there are.

Is our nation perfect? No, far from it.

But it’s a million times better than the alternative. Like I asked earlier, what freedoms that we’ve been granted in the last one hundred years are being taken away?

The answer is none.

The America I know and love has veered far off course and requires serious changes to get back on track. Much of the damage that’s been done to our country can’t be undone in one election cycle.

There’s been more than forty years of bad policy, trickle-down economics, bad trade deals, career politicians following in their father’s footsteps, philandering adulterers who perjured themselves to a grand jury, and eight long years of a community organizer who used the office of the president as a training ground.

The America I know and love has been fed a lie that that the rich are bad and shouldn’t get to be successful. Yet, isn’t success, wealth, and the American dream what’s being sold to entice immigrants to come to America? Isn’t this the country where we preach to immigrants the beauty of a life where they can build something special on a foundation of freedom and prosperity?

Maybe I’m mistaken. Maybe the American dream, to some, is when all these riches are given to them by the government through the philosophy of sharing the wealth.

The America I know and love stays out of the pocketbooks and lives of its citizens. It fixes a tax code that’s incredibly counterproductive and celebrates small business owners, gay or straight. It doesn’t criticize those who cut spending on services that are barely used and mostly abused. It doesn’t raid social security, while taking little action with regard to improving the quality of life for our nation’s veterans.

The America I know and love doesn’t lie about an income inequality problem that’s mostly a myth. Greed is insatiable, yes, but greed is only insatiable for those with power, authority, and a sense of entitlement. The America I love embraces protests, as long as there’s a positive outcome and action.

Do you see many positive outcomes and positive actions from groups like Antifa or others? I don’t. What’s intentional about screaming, looting, committing acts of violence, all in the name of protesting?

Are we a nation that simply runs to protest when we don’t get our way like a spoiled child, or are we a nation that takes action in order to have positive impact? After all, wasn’t it Martin Luther King himself who encouraged action by stating “if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”

I won’t ever respect a protest without positive action behind it.

I’m not sad living in America. I’m encouraged because for the first time in decades, I feel empowered, even emboldened. There’s a large wave of Americans, both young and old, who are equally as empowered and emboldened as I am, and who are taking action.

Just search for #WalkAway Campaign and you’ll see exactly what I mean. I’m proud to stand with my fellow American’s who are champions of the #WalkAway movement.

Our nation is at a point where a breakthrough is necessary, and it begins with us, it’s citizens. If we believe every negative thing we hear and see, we will become that negative thing we focus on.

The America I love is not about who’s right and who’s wrong. It’s about the love our forefathers had for one another when they formed this great republic. They argued and fought but did so because they cared for and loved one another, not because they wanted to kill each other. They saw the need to create a nation that governed itself with civility, law and freedom.

They saw the need to desperately flee one tyrant 3,000 miles away and avoid a nation with 3,000 tyrants less than one mile away.

Charles Krauthammer once said “Ideas matter. Legislative proposals matter. Slick campaigns and dazzling speeches can work for a while, but the magic always wears off.”

Don’t believe the literary magic you read online, especially the ones that are slick and dazzle you.

Instead, believe in the America that offers the freedom to hope, worship, and pursue a life of liberty and happiness.

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