The Best Advice Ever Received From Mike Rowe

I recently watched a video, a TEDtalk to be exact. The TED was of Mike Rowe, host of the Discovery Channel reality show called Dirty Jobs.

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In this TED, Mike Rowe describes, in detail, the aspects of working in hard environments.

About 2/3 through the talk, Mike begins equating his Dirty Jobs, into two Greek terms.

The one term is called Anagnorisis and the other is Peripeteia. Each have significant meaning to Mike and his TED.

I won’t define them here.

Mike then goes on to talk about how his personal circumstance and discovery (Anagnorisis) drives him to the conclusion that life is about hard work, not chasing your passion.

The advice he received about chasing your dreams and passions, albeit from supposed wise mentors, is the worst advice he’s ever received.

I tend to agree with him.

Mike Rowe is brilliant and he is also right.

Life on this earth can have incredible meaning. But that meaning and purpose is defined by sacrificing self and NOT following whatever I want, rather giving up dreams to serve others.

Joseph in the Old Testament went through this, as his brothers sold him into slavery. Joseph then became a prison inmate. Most importantly, Joseph vowed to be the best prison inmate he could possibly be. He didn’t chase his passion while in prison.

Job was one of the wealthiest men in the bible. God took it all, instantly. Job never once cursed God. Rather he praised God in his trial.

He didn’t do what he wanted to do, or chase his passion. He was obedient. (for Job’s obedience, God gave Job twice as much wealth in the end)

I am grateful I didn’t listen to my high school guidance counselor.

My high school guidance counselor told me to go into 2 fields: teaching or physical therapy.

I’m glad I didn’t listen to him. He also told me life is a big ocean. Again, I’m glad I didn’t listen to this ridiculous advice.

It’s okay to be a dreamer, just understand that sometimes in life it’s not about chasing your passion, and more about hard work, in the circumstance you’re in.

Work hard and give to others and serve them.

Mike Rowe’s advice is the opposite of what we hear everyday, but I guarantee by working hard and persevering, it’s the best advice you’ll ever receive.

Now get back to work.

Five not-wrong-but-annoying-things you can do on Twitter

I’m addicted to Twitter.

It’s short, sweet, to the point and relevant! It’s such a great way to communicate.

But man is it frustrating when I login to my Twitter account only to see some of my followers completely hijack my Twitter feed because they choose to post random things 50 times in a row.

Here’s an example: you check Twitter and see 50 posts…from the same person.

Annoying. So what does this do?

It ends up flooding my Twitter feed from anything relevant and good.

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I’ve got a solution. I’ve created a guide that you can follow, with five technically not wrong — but annoying — things you can do on Twitter that cause the world to shift out of alignment. These five things are practices you should avoid.

  1. When posting throughout the day, don’t Tweet 50 Tweets all at once. By randomly and strategically Tweeting throughout the day, you’ll gather more followers because you won’t annoy the masses. You’ll get more traction — in terms of relevance — and engage more people.
  2. Tweets with food pics. Okay, this is just gross. I’m guilty of it, just like many Twitter addicts. Enough said.
  3. If it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, it’s a duck. If you follow a Twitter account that looks naughty and share their content, you could potentially look silly. If it looks subjective, then it probably is. Plus, no one likes to get a call or email from your social media manager asking, “did you know that you shared a inappropriate photo of Kim Kardashian…again?” Avoid those touchy conversations.
  4. Political Tweets. Be kind here. If you’re complaining about various political candidates via Twitter and it’s perceived as negative, then it’s negative. No one likes a “Negative Nelly” or a “Debbie Downer.” Be kind, be high level and be encouraging.
  5. Be creative and original. Don’t post the same stuff all the time. Tweet about a run or walk or a great coffee shop meeting. Engage people on Twitter with what you’re passionate about. Don’t Tweet the same stuff all the time.